Perfect Monochrome Bedroom for a little person

Perfect Monochrome Bedroom for a little person

Perfect Monochrome Bedroom for a little person

Perfect Room for a Little Person

 

Monochrome is the perfect look for a gender neutral room

Patricia Hoyna shows us how it’s done

 

The brief was to design a ‘gender neutral’ bedroom for a 3 1/2-year-old Sam. His parents had scrupulously avoided pink and blue when buying toys and clothes in order to avoid the limitations of stereotyped gender roles. In Sweden, where Sam’s parents come from, national curriculum requires preschools to “counteract traditional gender roles and gender patterns”, children are encouraged to explore.

The Scandi love for black and white is still going strong and what better way to use a monochrome colour scheme and inject some colour and playfulness with accent tones, fun toys and inspiring accessories! Sam loves animals, especially those featured in his books, so I found plenty of them. I sourced different shapes and sizes, some animals are there to hug and provide comfort, some to hold.

Sam’s stack of books keeps the room bright! There is something wonderfully crisp, calming and clean about black and white combo. As with every other colour, a successful room design is about getting the proportions right. When I chat to kids about their colour preferences, they often choose a pair: pink and purple or red and blue. I always honour their wishes, but the method is that one colour must dominate, otherwise it’s a visual disaster and it would be quite unsettling. The best approach is to split the colours to 70:30 ratio. Because it’s a room for a little one, I’ve opted for 70% white and 30% black with a splash of warm and cheery yellow. Bringing an accent colour can do wonders to elevate the look and feel of the space.

Top Tip
When designing a room don’t just think about the colour – pattern and texture are equally important

I have a tip for you: when designing a room don’t just think about the colour – pattern and texture are equally important. The wallpaper I chose, with its subtle design, makes the room feel cosier without overwhelming the eye. The combination of different patterns provides visual interest. It’s the same with texture: bring in a variety of textiles that are pleasant to touch. Comfort has much more to do with the way we feel rather than the way it looks. The most sensual fabrics delight the skin. How about a mohair blanket, wool rug or velvet cushion? These are tried and tested for pleasure zones. I use them in layers for flexibility, piling them up in the winter and stripping them down in summer.

Sam enjoys drawing, so despite the room being of modest proportions, we’ve found a desk where this little artist can work on producing wonderful artworks. Children are incredibly creative and there is a better way of sticking their drawings than with a magnet to the fridge. The selection of lovely frames in all shapes and colours are easily accessible, so why not make a fuss and create a lovely exhibition in the hallway?! Not only will it give them sense of pride and recognition but also by expanding their input to other rooms than their bedroom we make it a home without boundaries.

Patricia Hoyna lives and works in Edinburgh, check out the rest of her portfolio here.

More by Patricia Hoyna…

The Scandi Home

The Scandi Home

The Scandi Home

The Scandi Home

 

In the third of three parts, Nete Vester explains how to adapt your

Scandinavian style home to life with kids

 

Welcome to third and final part of our great series on how to achieve the Scandi look. We’ve looked at kids’ rooms and nurseries, now we’ll finish with Nete Vester, of Moberry interiors, taking us through the key elements we need to consider when trying to adapt our homes to life with children, whilst still achieving this natural and stylish feel throughout your home.

Having children changes everything, including the requirements to your home. It is possible to have a beautiful home which accommodates all ages and is not overtaken with children’s things and toys.

Having helped families adapting their home to life with children for a while now, I see some common challenges and opportunities that people are facing and overseeing. There are more areas to be described: as with everything, one size does not fit all.

Safety Always

Safety comes first. As little ones grow, new security items have to be installed and removed. Just because all glass, candles and other sensitive items have to be placed out of reach of the little hands, you don’t have to store them away for 5 years. Think about higher spaces like shelves or fireplaces where your beautiful and personal items can be displayed. Safety items come in many variations and they don’t have to be extremely eye catching. For example look into see-through table corner guards.

Well balanced play area in living room by Modsy

Colour and Paint

What colours make you happy in your home? Look for inspiration in your current furniture and your wardrobe because this helps you to see what shades and colours you like. Whatever colour scheme you had before having children, carry it through the house. Think about this when buying furniture for the children. Paint is very helpful here: a wooden stool or storage box can easily be upcycled with some paint of your choice.
I love the simplicity of white walls, but they can be a challenge in busy areas of a house, where the paint can quickly become very greasy and dirty. Simply use a darker paint on the bottom of the wall and a brighter colour above and you will protect the walls from a lot of wear and tear.

 

Two-part wall hiding marks by hitta-hem

Avoid Clutter, Keep it Simple

As a Scandinavian, anti-clutter is a way of life. I suggest that you keep your life simple; try to limit the amount of furniture, clothes or papers you have in your home. Babies and children do require additional equipment, but I often see people overdoing it. If you are moving additional furniture into your living room and/or kitchen, for example, be aware the space can become cramped. If possible, move pieces around, or remove something to keep the space airy.

Children do use a lot of clothes, but they don’t need 20 t-shirts. The same goes for toys. Research shows that too many options make children confused, so avoid overdoing it by not constantly buying new things, rotating what you have and donating what you don’t use. In a world of overconsumption we parents need to role-model these habits for our kids.

Easy to reach toy storage area behind sofa by Moberry Interior

The Clever Storage

“I have too much storage” – said no one ever! Storage is always key, but with children it’s even more important. Closed off or partly closed off storage creates a calm and simple feeling in adult areas. For toys, it’s always a balance between storing their toys and keeping it easily within eyesight and reach – we don’t want them to forget what they have. Help them out by rotating baskets of toys or open a drawer. Put some of their books out to encourage reading; get a nice pencil holder for their table. If you don’t have space for an actual storage furniture get a nice basket to dump their toys into after use – even little ones can help you with tidying up. As for clothes, invest in a good cupboard or a chest of drawers, as clothes look messy when visible. 

Storage by Homepolish. Designer: Megan Born, Homepolish. Photo: Dustin Halleck

Furniture For Everyone

Children’s furniture can be calm and easy on the eye. Not everything has to be brightly coloured!  As an example, think about what will work in your entranceway. This is the first impression you give of your home, yet it’s one of the most overseen areas. Buy a nice storage bench where you can help children with their shoes and outwear. Good storage for shoes and jackets is vital to avoid being met with clutter when entering a room. Consider how to avoid chaos in the morning – your own keys, purse and phone need to be in an easy reachable place for you. In other rooms, such as a living room and dining room/kitchen, a cool tent, a small table with chairs for kids or a chalkboard can be a great addition in any interior. Again, think about how it blends into the remaining furniture and look of the space.

Zoned play area by the dining table by Room to Bloom

Zone It In

I’m a massive fan of zoning areas for children. It is a great way to welcome them and their play in all rooms while avoiding their toys being everywhere. Use rugs, lights or storage solutions to frame in a play area in your kitchen, dining room or living room. It can equally be the back of your sofa or a corner of an open plan room, marked by paint on the wall.

Cheat Sheet

• Create two-toned walls by painting the lower part in a slightly darker colour, to hide the prints from the small (often dirty) hands. 
• Think heights when wanting to store your valuable accessories, such as fireplaces and shelves
• Ensure to create space for play
• Add in chair seats for your adult chairs and save space by not having high chairs
• Closed or partly closed off storage creates a calm and simple feeling
• A good and practical entrance is important. A big shoe mat to catch the dirt, a bench for helping the children, good shoe and outwear storage and a smart place to store your own essentials, such as purse and keys, are all highly useful
• Use durable materials; leather and furniture fabric with high rob counts. Dark coloured or multi-pattern fabric also hides any unwanted marks
• For rugs, go for an easy to clean and durable material such as natural fibres. Look for patterns and colours too. You may also choose an indoor/outdoor rug. They are very forgiving
• Display your kids’ art work in a nice frame
• Zone in your kids’ play space by a rug, paint, storage or light
• Ottomans are great because of their flexibility. They are often are low enough to fitting a child seatake your nursery unique

Happy nursery decorating.

If you like Scandi Style…

OYOY Living – For Families

OYOY Living – For Families

Rooomy talks to Lotte Fynboe, Creator of OYOY Living   Rachel Burns speaks to Lotte and takes a peak behind the Scandinavian brand she created straight out of college Always thinking about children and the whole family home   Let's meet Lotte who studied deign...

Scandi For Baby

Scandi For Baby

Scandi For Baby

Scandi For Baby

 

In the second of three parts, Nete Vester explains how to achieve the

Scandinavian style for your Nursery

 

Welcome to part two of our great three-part series on how to achieve the Scandi look. We’ve heard so much about how beautiful and practical it is. Nete Vester of Moberry interiors takes us through the key elements we need to consider when trying to create this natural feel for our newborns’ nurseries.

Creating a nursery for your baby is an exciting task as it’s their first part of your home. As with any other Scandi design, the core principles remain the same; clean lines, muted colours and functionality, all tailored around the baby’s need. This article will give you some insights on how to apply a Nordic style in your nursery.

Back to the nature

Very much linked to colour is the choice of materials. Scandinavians love being in or close to the nature, which is why wood and other natural materials like cotton and wool are preferred. Combining  materials also creates depth and visual interest in a room. The nurseries in most Scandi homes come with wooden floor and a good rug both add some warmth and facilitate play.

Functional and Beautifully designed furniture by Sebra.

Colour Codes

As when decorating any room, start with the colour scheme you want to achieve. Colour psychology is a huge subject because every colour has a different effect on the human body. The foundation of Scandi design is brightness and subtle colours with white often being the clean backdrop for the walls. Conveniently this is also the shade associated with innocence. If you are looking for an alternative, light grey is a good choice. With calmness essential in a baby nursery, add some secondary colours in natural, dusky shades to create some visual interest, both for you and the baby. From here you can easily play around with more colours by adding cushions, wall stickers, or rugs. A good starting point for inspiration is your own home, combined with the enormous source of inspiration online e.g. Pinterest.

 

Layout and quality

Next, consider the need of the room in order to get the right layout: will the baby sleep with you, do you need a changing table in there etc. It’s time to start thinking about the bigger main pieces of furniture including cot, changing table, a nursing chair , drawers or other clothing storage. My advice is to invest in a few good quality pieces of furniture that grow with your children – you will be using these for a good few years, possibly longer if you are considering having more kids. Scandi’s love a good, high quality design. If you are on a budget, look at the many great second hand resources available – as with any good design and quality, they keep the standard and value well and you can always resell it when you no longer need it.

“As with any good design and quality, they keep the standard and value well
and you can always resell it when you no longer need it

Cot in natural look and materials

by Lil’Gaea

The importance of light

Light can make or break any room and with the long winters in mind, Scandinavians love multiple light sources. Even though nurseries are for the early childhood stage, the right light is important, e.g. for playing, quiet time etc. Dimmers are great as they adjust your light to any situation. Various task lights, such as a reading light, a ceiling lamp for when entering the room, and light for play do make a difference too. Combining light sources is key for creating hygge, especially during the dark winter months.

Rug and Pear storage basket 

by Ferm Living

Keep it minimal

And now we are at the subject of stuff. While babies come with more gear than we often initially anticipate, try to keep it simple. Babies, and children in general don’t need a lot of toys and things around them. Creating space for play and creativity, even at a young age, is much more important. A good activity mat, a cute mobile and a few simple pieces of toys will do. If you have received too many presents, rotate them. You will quickly find out which items are keepers and what might be better suited in a charity shop.

Multifunctional changing table

by Done by Deer

Functionality and storage

Functionality is key in any Scandi room. When investing in the bigger furniture, aim at multi-functional ones, preferably with storage. This is the one thing you cannot get enough of and is key in order to preserve clean lines aligned with Scandi principles. You might as well invest in good storage from the start and if bought with a longer perspective in mind, they can be used at later childhood stages too. Remember that vertical surfaces can be used too for books and toys, so using the space cleverly and also adding some decoration.

Make your nursery unique

Add your personal touch by including some original items in the nursery. Items that mean something to you or have a history are a good start, but it can be anything. It’s also a good way to avoid the feeling of everything being bought at the same time, leaving a catalogue feeling.

Safety

Needless to say, safety comes above everything in a nursery, Scandinavian design or not. Before you know it, babies start to become mobile and stand up, so do ensure to mount everything to the wall, keep small pieces out of reach and don’t leave any hanging items around.

Happy nursery decorating.

If you like Scandi Style…

OYOY Living – For Families

OYOY Living – For Families

Rooomy talks to Lotte Fynboe, Creator of OYOY Living   Rachel Burns speaks to Lotte and takes a peak behind the Scandinavian brand she created straight out of college Always thinking about children and the whole family home   Let's meet Lotte who studied deign...

Scandi For Kids Rooms

Scandi For Kids Rooms

Scandi For Kids Rooms

Scandi For Kids

 

In the first of three parts Nete Vester explains how to achieve the

Scandinavian style for your kids’ room

 

Welcome to a great three-part series on how to achieve the Scandi look. We’ve heard so much about how beautiful and practical it is. Nete Vester of Moberry interiors takes us through the key elements we need to consider when trying to create this natural feel for our children’s bedrooms.

When decorating any room, it’s good to start with the colour scheme you wish to create. Take a look around your home to get inspiration and to create a cohesive style across your home. Needless to say, Scandinavian colours are muted and subtle, and while colours are very much an individual preference, it has been proven that muted colours do create a more tranquil environment.

If kids were to choose, the colour palette would probably resemble a box full of LEGO, so one solution is to choose a few colours, one perhaps being a bit brighter, and then make them chose from these. Thereby you control the colour palette, while leaving them feeling empowered. Muted colours does not mean varying shades of white, though white is often a key base in Scandinavian interior.

Optimising space with multifunctional furniture. Flexa® are known for their functional, playful and sustainable room solutions.

Less is more – quality over quantity

You are probably tired of this line by now, but there is really something to it. Too many choices are not necessarily good for children and decluttering their toys will create a calmer setting. If you don’t want to get rid of some of their toys, you can rotate it on an ongoing basis. Avoid having too much furniture in the room; invest in high quality and well-designed furniture. These pieces normally keep their value and you want to sell them later.

Keeping it simple. Elements Optimal produces iconic, high quality design pieces

“Invest in high quality and well designed furniture. 
These pieces normally keep their value

Creating space – storage is king

Whether the room is big or small, create floor space as this is where play happens. Think out of the box for storage and utilise the vertical space in the room too e.g. by having wall bookcases or cabinets. Good and easy to reach storage is key for enabling easy play and quick tidying up. Quick tidying means you can easily maintain a clean look. It also stimulates the children to play independently and to make their own choices when playing, instead of depending on an adult to reach and chose for them.

Functionality first

The Scandinavian style is very much about multifunctional and lasting design, which also work very well in kids’ rooms. When a piece can do more than one job, i.e., toy box and bench, you may be able to save some space and have less items in the room. Furniture which also contains storage are great e.g. a bed with storage or a closet with a desk.

Bringing in the nature

For a Scandinavian look, materials are all about wood and natural fabrics. The philosophy is to create calm surroundings by following the examples of nature. If you want to use wood, most Scandi lovers stick to a light palette: beech, ash, pine. Most Scandinavian rooms will have wooden floor with rugs and other calm looking accessories do create some ‘hygge’.

Light

Finally, but very importantly, is the light. Make the most of natural light by avoiding heavy looking curtains; don’t put too many things in the window. To obtain complete darkness for the evenings, you can always install some basic blackout roller blinds. For lamps, ensure that you have plenty of light sources e.g. by combining floor lamps, table lamps, wall lights and ceiling light. Use these various lights to zone in an area like a reading light for a reading area or a desk lamp.

Finally, below are listed some good sources for buying Scandinavian or Scandinavian looking furniture and accessories for the nursery:
Scandiborn
Mollymeg.co.uk
Nubie.co.uk
Fermliving.com
Smallable.co.uk

If you like Scandi Style…

OYOY Living – For Families

OYOY Living – For Families

Rooomy talks to Lotte Fynboe, Creator of OYOY Living   Rachel Burns speaks to Lotte and takes a peak behind the Scandinavian brand she created straight out of college Always thinking about children and the whole family home   Let's meet Lotte who studied deign...

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